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Tedy

Story

Relentlessly searching, redefining himself, and smashing past his perceived limits is the recurring theme of Tedy’s life. From the start, he’s been unusually comfortable taking creative risks, pushing himself to the next challenge, and always seeking to upend perceptions and (mis)conceptions about who he is and what he is capable of. It’s a cliche to say an artist isn’t content to rest on his laurels, but in Tedy’s case it’s a way of being.

Tedy (real name Ted Andreville) was born in Haiti in 1991, immigrating with his parents and two sisters, one his twin, to Florida when he was 10. The family moved often in those years, before eventually settling in Montreal when Tedy was 17. His childhood and adolescence were marked by a sense of deep isolation – never quite fitting in, searching to find his place and his people, struggling to connect with friends, root his identity, break free from the traditional structures of family and duty, and dream about whom he could become as an artist. This pervasive sense of dislocation made childhood and adolescence lonely.

Tedy is reflective and upfront about how this loneliness impacted him. “It wasn’t easy, I was always struggling, struggling, struggling. It was so dark, I felt just totally alone. But now I think that it pushed me to create and to take risks to find myself. Even in those days, I was so alone, it felt like I only had music. From the time I was little, I would sing to myself in English. And then when we moved to the States, and I didn’t know the language, I just listened to music constantly to feel connected to something – anything.”

When Tedy was 18, he began making YouTube videos as the “Reaction King.” His following grew over time, and he eventually amassed over a million subscribers. He had an almost preternatural ease on the platform – hilarious, exuberant, expressive. YouTube was the perfect setting to showcase his larger-than-life personality. Tedy is clear-eyed about this time. “It felt like a collection of unpopular kids making stupid stuff to be themselves and all of a sudden all the weird kids became popular.” For the first time, he had an audience, and he also experienced some financial stability, which gave him his independence and allowed him to dream a little bigger. Watching Tedy’s
“Reaction King” videos made viewers feel like they were friends with this person – or wanted to be his best friend, and for the first time in his life, Tedy was able to share his voice, or at least a part of who he was.

But along with this so-called success came a new level of exposure and the mounting pressure that inevitably comes in the glare of a social media spotlight. Chasing likes, counting views, constantly posting – Tedy began to find it both relentless and creatively constricting. The whole experience became a grind and he started to resent the constant pressure and the version of himself he was presenting to the world. He had more to say, and a richer, sometimes darker, story to tell. At one point, Tedy felt like he had an existential choice to make: he was either going to make music and express himself more fully or he was not going to survive. “I said to myself, I am either gonna end it right now, or I am going to follow my dream and write a song.” It was time to move forward – no matter the costs. He began to write.

In 2014, Tedy put pen to paper to explore his obsession and make sense of the melodies and lyric fragments that had all along been swirling in his head. The result was “Soar,” a piano-heavy ballad that hinted at the pop sensibility that Tedy would continue to hone as he developed as a singer and songwriter. His early songs explored his personal journey, mental health struggles, and sense of isolation and longing. They were starkly emotional, and they resonated. An early single, 2016’s “Can I,” currently approaches nine million streams on Spotify, and Tedy has steadily built his audience over the past eight years.

Tedy has always been an artist, and music has been the relentless undercurrent in his life. From those lonely teen days listening to Michael Jackson, Celine Dion, Rihanna, and Britney Spears on repeat in his bedroom, Tedy used music as a way to make sense of and connect to the world around him. He felt deeply called to songwriting and discovering the power of his voice. He was finally sharing who he really was. It was a revelation.

The next step was a leap for Tedy as a performing artist: opening for Tate McRae to a sold-out crowd in Toronto in 2019. The performance was powerful – his voice was rich and strong and his sound fused pop hooks with R+B vocal power. It was a sign of good things to come. Holding an audience captive was “the best feeling in the world,” says
Tedy. “It’s s all I want to do.”

In 2020, Tedy released his EP Boys Don’t Cry, featuring production by Mike Wise (Bulow, Ellie Goulding, Chainsmokers). Early that year, he moved from Montreal to Toronto to begin work on his follow-up EP. This move coincided with the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, and an intense personal and creative interlude. Tedy publicly came out that year and spent time reflecting on what it means to be an artist, songwriter, gay man, performer, person of colour, and Haitian-Canadian. He also spent the time practicing: honing his songwriting skills and working on developing his vocal range in preparation for 2022 and Manic Party, his soon-to-be released and hotly anticipated second EP.

The tracks on Manic Party are infused with irresistible hooks, introspective lyrics, and soaring vocals. The music still grapples with deep issues: finding connection, discovering himself, and becoming the artist he feels called to be, pairing these themes with incredible A-list production by Big Taste (Justin Bieber, Dua Lipa), and Dallas K (Lauv, Tiesto, Fifth Harmony); mixing by Mitch McCarthy (Olivia Rodrigo, Bebe Rexa); and mastering by Randy Merrill (Adele, Silk Sonic). The album is a hook-driven pop celebration from an artist who has traveled a long road to find his community and himself. Tedy’ss nearly 40 million global audio streams and nearly one million followers on TikTok are a testament to his charisma, creativity, and ability to craft songs that speak to people. These fans are ready for new music and to hear what Tedy has to say. And thankfully, he’s just getting started.

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